Auteur Sujet: DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX  (Lu 2833 fois)

Hors ligne VE2UGO Hugo

  • Membre guru
  • *****
  • Messages: 863
  • Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio
    • http://files.qrz.com/m/kd4sm/life.jpg
DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« le: 13 Novembre 2014, 17:17:44 »
We support the DX Code of Conduct

Please read and understand before calling http://dx-code.org/



I will listen, and listen, and then listen again before calling.

I will only call if I can copy the DX station properly.

I will not trust the DX cluster and will be sure of the DX station's call sign before calling.

I will not interfere with the DX station nor anyone calling and will never tune up on the DX frequency or in the QSX slot.

I will wait for the DX station to end a contact before I call.

I will always send my full call sign.

I will call and then listen for a reasonable interval. I will not call continuously.

I will not transmit when the DX operator calls another call sign, not mine.

I will not transmit when the DX operator queries a call sign not like mine.

I will not transmit when the DX station requests geographic areas other than mine.

When the DX operator calls me, I will not repeat my call sign unless I think he has copied it incorrectly.

I will be thankful if and when I do make a contact.

I will respect my fellow hams and conduct myself so as to earn their respect.

 

Je supporte le Code de Conduite du DX

J'écouterai, j’écouterai toujours et puis, plus encore avant d'appeler.
 
J'appellerai seulement si je copie la station convenablement.

Je ne ferai pas aveuglement confiance au DX-cluster et je me rassurerai par d’autres moyens de l’indicatif correct de la station DX avant de l'appeler.

Je ne causerai aucune interférence à la station DX ni à n'importe quelle autre station qui l’appelle et je n’accorderai jamais mon émetteur sur la fréquence de la station DX ni dans sa fenêtre d’écoute.

J'attendrai toujours que la station DX ait vraiment fini un QSO avant de l'appeler.

J'utiliserai toujours mon indicatif complet.
 
Après un bref appel j'écouterai la fréquence de la station DX pendant une période raisonnable.
 
Je n'appellerai jamais sans interruption.

Je ne transmettrai pas quand l'opérateur de DX appelle un autre indicatif que le mien.

Je ne transmettrai pas quand la station DX appelle une autre station que moi.

Je ne transmettrai pas quand la station DX appelle pour des régions autres que celle dans laquelle je me trouve.

Quand la station DX m'appelle, je ne répéterai pas mon indicatif à moins que je pense qu'il ne l'a copié correctement.

Je serai reconnaissant si et quand j'ai fait un QSO avec la station DX.

J’aurai toujours du respect pour mes collègues radioamateurs, et je me comporterai de façon à mériter leur respect.

Hors ligne VE2UGO Hugo

  • Membre guru
  • *****
  • Messages: 863
  • Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio
    • http://files.qrz.com/m/kd4sm/life.jpg
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #1 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 02:49:55 »
DX Code of Conduct

#1   I will listen, and listen and then listen again before calling.

  This seems so obvious but it is the most vital thing to do. Careful listening rather than rushing to transmit will get the DX into your log. You must listen to find out whether the DX is working split and if so, where is he listening? Then you need to listen to the calling stations in order to determine what the DX station is doing. For example, he may be working gradually up or down the pile-up frequency range – and you need to find the best spot to call. And it may be time to ask yourself: “Do I really need to work this bit of DX, right now? Can I wait a while for the pile-up to subside?” 


#2   I will only call if I can copy the DX station properly. 

   You also need to listen carefully to determine how well you can hear the DX station to be sure you will hear his reply to your call and to avoid causing interference by transmitting at the wrong time. It is extremely frustrating for a DX station to return a call to a station that is unable to hear him, thereby causing incessant QRM. 


#3   I will not trust the Cluster and will be sure of the DX station’s callsign before calling. 

   Cluster spots often show the wrong call sign. Before you log a station, you should hear the station’s callsign on the air – don’t trust spotting networks. The DX operator should send his call sign at regular intervals. Unfortunately, not all operators do this! 


#4   I will not interfere with the DX station or anyone calling and will never tune up on the DX frequency or in the QSX slot.

   Sadly, this covers a multitude of operators, employing poor operating practices. We are frequently afflicted with “Policemen,” people who repeatedly jump in to tell callers that “the DX is listening up” – often adding a gratuitous insult. The rule is quite simple: never, ever transmit on the DX frequency for any purpose whatsoever. 
I will pay attention to the operator's instructions if he is operating "split" so as to stay in his preferred bandwidth.


#5   I will wait for the DX station to end a contact before calling.

   If you transmit before a QSO is over, you are likely to interfere with the exchange of information, lengthening the QSO and slowing the process. It may seem clever to “nip in” as the previous contact is ending but many DX stations don’t like it, as such operating may break the pattern of the operator, which is what helps everyone to know when to transmit. 


#6   I will always send my full call sign. 

   This is essential for CW and SSB, because incomplete calls lead to an extra transmission, slowing the operator’s progress with the pileup. If the operator is responding to partial call signs, it may appear that you should call with only several letters. Generally, this is not the case.Always use your full call sign. 


#7  I will call and then listen for a reasonable interval. I will not call continuously.

   Continuous calling is selfish and arrogant. With a computer or memory keyer, it is easy to send continuously. Unfortunately, it prevents you from listening and knowing what is taking place. In addition, it raises the QRM floor greatly, making life difficult for the DX station and everyone else. 


#8   I will not transmit when the DX operator calls another callsign, not mine.

  Perhaps this is intuitively obvious, but it is a common occurrence. If it is clear that the station is not calling you, do not transmit.


#9   I will not transmit when the DX Operator queries a call sign, not like mine.

   In life outside amateur radio it would simply be considered rude to answer when someone else is asked a question! How do you know if the station is calling you? Perhaps the DX operator has a partial version of your call. Is it me? “The timing is right!” Yes, the timing may seem right, but it may also be “right” for many other stations. If the DX is actually calling you and hears nothing, he will call you again. Then you can call. Only one letter from your call sign is NOT enough, however. Calling when not being addressed raises the floor level of QRM and slows progress dramatically.


#10   I will not transmit when the DX operator requests geographic areas other than mine. 

   You must recognise and accept that when an operator is calling for a specific geographic area (e.g. NA for North America, AS for Asia ), you must not call until the operator’s instructions change. Even if his choice appears incorrect, you must follow his instructions. The DX operator is in control. Here’s an important point: If a DX operator is working, some area, perhaps North America , and he fails to say so between QSOs, do not begin calling immediately. Call only when it is clear that the operator’s instructions have changed. To do otherwise is impolite and simply slows the process. 


#11   When the DX operator calls me, I will not repeat my callsign unless I think he has copied it incorrectly.

   If you repeat your call sign, the DX station may think that he has your call sign wrong. He might then listen very carefully – again – thus slowing the process. A DX operator will generally log what he has if you say nothing further.


#12   I will be thankful if and when I do make a contact

   There should certainly be a pride of accomplishment when you get a QSO with a guy in a far-away entity. But before you start basking in the glow of accomplishment, think about the help you received from your partners, perhaps Mr. Icom, Mr. Alpha, and Mr. Force 12. If your ego still feels a need to take ALL the credit, try again. But this time turn off your amplifier and connect your rig barefoot to a dipole. If you get through the pile up this time, then YOU, as the operator, can take more of the credit.
   You should also acknowledge that you would not have had the contact without the skill of the operator at the other end who undoubtedly made sacrifices to be there for you. So be thankful for all this help you received.  


#13   I will respect my fellow hams and conduct myself so as to earn their respect.

   Respect is about behaving well toward others. DXing is very competitive. If you operate otherwise, you may acquire a bad reputation. DXing will be the most fun for everyone if we all behave with politeness, mutual respect and even a bit of humility! ! 

Hors ligne VA2JOT Jacques

  • Membre guru
  • *****
  • Messages: 3 825
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #2 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 10:59:15 »
jait deja envoyer 3 - 4 email a du monde quit operait en RTTY durent un farwest  eeee contes sur des frequence  PSK31 et ou JT65 ,avec le link sur la liste des frequence digital je peux pas croirequit le save pas et entedre pas les autre signal ?
T'ète bien que oui pis t'ète bien que non. Propagation 101: Le fait que tu entends deux stations sur la même fréquence n'est pas une assurance que ces deux mêmes stations sont conscientes de la présence de l'autre.

En HF, je considère que les "band plans" manquent de crédibilité dans le sens qu'il en existe un grand nombre et qu'il n'y a pas consensus de bout en bout (ils ne disent pas tous la même chose). Comparez celle du WARC, de RAC et de l'ARRL pour les attributions non-vocales et vous comprendrez. Le terme numérique (digital modes) semble être pris pour un gobe-tout. Ca explique pourquoi on se retrouve avec du RTTY de 450 Hz de large avec du PSK-31 qui en demande dix fois moins. Que ;leur motif soit politique ou pas, c'est quand même naïf de la part de ces organisations de se faire accroire que le HF s'arrête aux limites des frontières du pays et de ne pas faire d'efforts pour accoucher d'un band plan coordonné qui tient compte de cette réalité scientifique

Un autre phénomène de propagation est celui ou une station "blast" à pleins haut-parleurs dans votre RX. Cela ne signifie pas pour autant qu'il utilise trop de puissance car vous n'êtes nullement en position pour déterminer à quel niveau le reçoit le destinataire de la transmission. Le seul indice pour estimer à quel niveau une station distante reçoit l'autre est le rapport de signal retourné puisque vous n'êtes pas en mesure de tirer quelque conclusion que ce soit n'étant pas au même endroit. Encore faudrait-il perdre cette satané habitude de donner un rapport de signal "Zombie" de 5-9 à tout ce que vous entendez. Pensez-y, vous pratiquez de la désinformation systématisée.

Y'a des régions sur le globe ou le niveau de bruit naturel est tellement intense qu'il peut être de 3 à 5 ou davantage de S units plus haut que le votre. Ca aussi pourrait expliquer pourquoi "l'autre" n'entend pas la station envers laquelle il cause présumément sans le vouloir, du QRM. Si vous avez opéré ou fait de l'écoute à partir de divers points sur le globe, vous savez de quoi je parle.

Est-ce que d'après vous tous les amateurs s'y connaissent suffisamment en propagation pour pouvoir discerner entre de l'interférence volontaire ou qu'une station est victime d'un des nombreux phénomènes faisant partie des aléas de la propagation?

Je me permet d'en douter très fortement. C'est pourquoi j'ai tendance à prime abord de présumer que l'interférant n'a pas d'intentions malicieuses jusqu'à la preuve du contraire.

 ;)

VE2OLM

  • Invité
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #3 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 11:18:53 »
Qoute  "Propagation 101: Le fait que tu entends deux stations sur la même fréquence n'est pas une assurance que ces deux mêmes stations sont conscientes de la présence de l'autre."

hi hi meme avec un bout de broche ont entent tres bien les douzaine et plut de station quit sont partout en JT65 et PSK31
pour pas les entendre faux etre motiver ;-)  surtotu en plin costest  , a 14,076 si tu entent persone check ton radio  ;D

bon jose esperer que ses juste car en RTTY les op metre laudio a off donk il save pas ce quit se pase ,sauf pour ce quit defile dnas leur ecrant , et je opte pour la solution email  pour eviter de faire partie du problemem en leur disant en RTTY

parcontre en phonie sa peux tres bien arriver de  involontaireemnt pas savoir que la frequence et ocuper

Hors ligne VA2JOT Jacques

  • Membre guru
  • *****
  • Messages: 3 825
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #4 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 12:05:14 »
si tu entent persone check ton radio  ;D Désolé mais si tu es incapable de comprendre que le fait que tu copies bien deux station chez toi que ce n'est pas la preuve que le skip est ouvert entre ces mêmes deux stations (et qu'elle s'entendent) je te suggère fortement de consulter de nouveau ta documentation sur la propagation.

C'est fondamental sinon, expliques moi pourquoi il existe le terme QSP? Ca c'est quand une station qui copie bien deux autres stations mais que ces dernières ne s'entendent pas, elle sert de relais (QSP) entre ces deux stations.

Retournes à la case départ  ;)
« Modifié: 15 Novembre 2014, 12:39:11 par VA2JOT Jacques »

VE2OLM

  • Invité
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #5 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 13:17:25 »
Hi    PSK31  sur 2.5Khz il a normalement jusqua 30 QSO simultaner et probablment 100 a 200 station diferente
serieux las je voit pas comet ont pourait en recevoir aucunne !! 

meme chose en JT65  mait las ses limiter a ~15 QSO par 2.5Khz 

donk je parle pas ict de 2 station mait de centainne toute dans la bande pasente du receiver statistiquement tu doit en entrene au moit une ..  et au pire jait eu lair dun dingo  mait sa serait pas la premire ou la derniere  hi hi

et comme jait dit  en phonie efectivement ton point sapplique et il et juste

en pasent a tu deja esayer de te preseter sur le resaux 2m ssb de quebec ?   la sem passer ont a eu une sattion de MTL

73!

Hors ligne VA2JOT Jacques

  • Membre guru
  • *****
  • Messages: 3 825
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #6 le: 15 Novembre 2014, 14:46:38 »
serieux las je voit pas comet ont pourait en recevoir aucunne !! 

Moi non plus, je n'ai que parlé de deux stations qu'on copiait mais qui ne se copiaient pas entre-elles. Si une transmet pendant qu'on tente de communiquer avec l'autre, on peut facilement interpréter ça comme du QRM volontaire mais comment faire pour savoir si les deux se copient? La question est là.

Pour QC et le 2M, désolé, je ne fais plus de BLU depuis que ma Yagi 10EL ne fonctionne plus.

Hors ligne VE2AKS

  • Nouveau membre
  • *
  • Messages: 8
  • Bonjour!
Re : DX Code of Conduct - Code de Conduite du DX
« Réponse #7 le: 18 Novembre 2014, 21:50:32 »
Antenne, propagation et intérêt sont aussi des facteurs à considérer bien avant la puissance d'émission. Quelqu'un qui n'est pas intéressé par une provenance géographique peut tout simplement passer son chemin et ne pas donner suite.

Quand aux plans de bande ce ne sont que de simples recommandations (du moins de ce que j'en comprends...) pas d'obligations donc oui en effet il faut y accorder une attention un peu nuancée surtout quand les contests arrivent ça peut déborder ;)